Blog

Update From Judy Kennelley

Judy Kennelley - Thursday, February 09, 2017

OK, I was held at ransom by my marketing people to release my first blog. In case you missed it, it was “5 Steps CEOs Should Do in Interviews” when hiring senior candidates. I’m pretty sure it won’t be going viral anytime soon (can be viewed on our website).

My original thought when asked to give 5 hiring tips for CEOs was:

1 - Hire Judy Kennelley’s team to fill all your senior level positions.

2 – Call Judy Kennelley right now if you have any open positions.

3 – Call all your friends and have them call Judy Kennelley if they need senior candidates.

4 – Turn 1, 2 & 3 above into a mantra you repeat at all your executive team meetings.

5 – Who the **** is Judy Kennelley!

Obviously, I lost the vote when it came time to publish the blog, but the latter one might have had a better chance of going viral!

The past 5 years have been crazy busy for me in both my personal and professional life. Tom and I are about to see our two daughters graduate from college and start their professional lives. I’ve also been dealing with “circle of life” issues with my parents and I know that many of my friends are going through the same experience. Fortunately, Integrity Network has been blessed with an abundance of business with both local and national technology companies.

This blog series is intended to be a way to reach out to people that I may not have seen in a while and offer an electronic “hello”. I also want to give some of my insights into the things I see as potential problems when going through a hiring process. Over the years (25 years, ouch!), we’ve placed thousands of high level executives and interviewed tens of thousands of candidates. I’ve seen a lot in this job, both good and bad. There have been times when I’ve walked out of a meeting thinking “crap that person is SCARY smart” and others where I’ve thought the person should be on the cover of “Idiot’s Magazine”.

One thing that has frustrated me in this job is seeing incredibly talented people that don’t interview well, and subsequently are not hired for a perfect match. This happens on both sides of the table – candidates and the hiring executives. Often times candidates find a similar position at another company and are wildly successful.

I’m hoping this blog series can help, I promise I’ll have a tip next time.

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